International Biodiversity Day – Berbak National Park

Posted on May 22, 2013 in News | 0 comments

To celebrate International Biodiversity Day we focus on the work of The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and how their work impacts the survival of wild tigers.

CIFOR  advances human wellbeing, environmental conservation and equity by conducting research to inform policies and practices that affect forests in developing counties.

Loss of habitat is one of the major factors affecting the number of wild Sumatran tigers in the Berbak National Park in Indonesia.  As natural habitat vanishes to make way for Palm Oil plantations, tigers are driven into human populated farm and residential areas increasing ‘Human-Tiger Conflict.’

Whilst setting up camera traps in Berbak National Park, a team from the London Zoological Society (ZSL) discovered a set of tiger bones. On closer inspection the bones revealed that the tiger had been snared and left hanging for days, eventually dying of dehydration and hunger.

 

The video is quite distressing however necessary to understand the issues facing wildlife in this area. http://vimeopro.com/ciformedia/gunung-halimun-national-park/video/66376062 (This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Please credit accordingly and leave a comment here on Vimeo when you use a CIFOR video. Contact: cifor-mediainfo@cgiar.org)

The data collected from camera traps, foot patrols and collars tracking tigers as they move through forest is being relayed daily through a central database system that has helped reduce human-tiger conflict and improved protection efforts. It is essential to conservation efforts in this area.

“Technology has advanced so much in the last few years that we can now identify individual tigers and can get a more accurate picture of their behaviour as they move through the landscape. The database also gives people the incentive to share information.”

“It is all vital evidence to ensure tiger protection in the future.”

Click here to read in more detail, the findings from the CGIAR on Forest’s, Trees and Agroforestry.

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